Pricing Guides & Dictionary of Makers Marks for Antiques & Collectibles

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This is a sampling of interesting articles on several topics:

FREE RESEARCH GUIDES TO POTTERY & CERAMICS

See examples of makers marks & backstamps for Pottery and Art Ceramics in our guides

QUIMPER POTTERY & FRENCH FAIENCE EARTHENWARE

- Quimper Faience refers to a fine grain earthenware decorated with an opaque, tin based glaze. Each piece is completely hand painted without the use of decal or stencil by one of 48 painters (all but 4 are women). The majority of the patterns are painted on top of raw glaze, which is a formidable process. Signed by the artist and completely painted by one person from start to finish, it reflects the touches that makes Quimper is a true folk art... READ MORE

WEDGWOOD JASPERWARE POTTERY PORTRAITS & CAMEOS

- In 1774, Wedgwood wrote the following in his catalogue: "We beg leave in this place to observe that if gentlemen or ladies choose to have models of themselves, families, or friends made in wax or engraved in stones of proper size for seals, rings, lockets, or bracelets, they may have as many endurable copies of these models as they please, either in cameo or intaglio, for any of the above purposes, at a moderate expense... READ MORE

ENAMELED POTTERY & PORCELAIN FROM BIRMINGHAM, LIVERPOOL AND INDEPENDENT DECORATORS

- Though it is usually easy to decide whether an enameled object was made at Battersea or in South Staffordshire, it is difficult to attribute a piece which does not fit into either of these categories to one of the other possible sources. The extent of the problem will be realized when it is recalled that the Sadler factory at Liverpool and the smaller independent decorators purchased the... READ MORE

FAIENCE POTTERY: Brief Notes on its Origins & History

- Faience Pottery, also known as Fayence in France, is often used as a synonym to Majolica because of their similar appearance and use of Tin glaze. Yet, most collectors distinguish Faience pottery by their characteristic Polychrome (= multi-colored) designs and mostly white background, whereas Majolica tends to have decoration all over along with pronounced raised... READ MORE

ENGLISH DELFTWARE (BLUE & WHITE) POTTERY: Delft styled earthenware made in Bristol or London, UK

- The knowledge of tin-enamel glazes was brought to Europe by the Moors in the 12th century. Its immediate adoption upon its introduction to Spain and Italy, then to France, the Netherlands and England, is understandable when one considers that it made possible the use of painted decoration of an intricacy and variety of color which could not be achieved by the... READ MORE


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